I can honestly say from the experience of working on this project it is almost never as it seems. We began with targeting a very large segment of users (remember that time I talked about a keyword database of over 50,000 keywords?) but after a few months it turned out our largest (and most active) users were finding us from only a handful of targeted categories.

To find the right people I downloaded a list of some of the most popular users within the community. To do this, I used Screaming Frog SEO Spider to gather a list of all the URLs on the website. I then exported this list into an Excel spreadsheet and filtered the URLs to only show those that were user profile pages. I could do this because all of the profile pages had /user/ within the URL.
Granted, the blog post I wrote today gives you a taste of some of the strategies you can use to increase your organic search traffic. However, SEO is a lot more involved than that. As I said before, there are lots of courses on SEO, free and paid training you can follow. One great blog that I enjoy reading to increase my SEO knowledge is the HOTH. I actually linked to a post of theirs on “Domain Authority” in the section titled Off-Site SEO above.
Tailwind: This is an automatic scheduler designed mainly for Pinterest, and now also available for Instagram and Facebook. It operates on the same principles as Buffer and is a must if you use Pinterest extensively. It also has a Chrome extension. Tailwind has a 30 day trial and then is $15/month or $9.99/month if you pay annually. There are more plans to upgrade to if you need to.
This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?
The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"):

The number one reason we hit our traffic goal this year was because we were diligent and committed to repurposing and republishing old content. Necktafy supports this idea, and does a great job explaining what they call the “two-year blogging nosedive.” Summarized, the blogging nosedive is when a piece of content stops generating organic traffic, typically after two years.
The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"):
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