Granted, the blog post I wrote today gives you a taste of some of the strategies you can use to increase your organic search traffic. However, SEO is a lot more involved than that. As I said before, there are lots of courses on SEO, free and paid training you can follow. One great blog that I enjoy reading to increase my SEO knowledge is the HOTH. I actually linked to a post of theirs on “Domain Authority” in the section titled Off-Site SEO above.

There are more than half a billion active websites under the sun and most of the (almost 70%) of them struggle to get traffic due to the high competition and expense of the process like SEO or Digital Marketing. However, you can simple buy targeted traffic from various sources at any time you want! Every paid ad campaign is an attempt to get traffic in exchange of money. However the reasons behind getting traffic are pretty different from each other. Some people buy traffic to get sales, some buy traffic to get leads, some buy traffic for brand exposure, some buy traffic to gain authority and improve rank on several metrics and so more.
Guest blogging purely for inbound links is a flawed strategy because the value of those links are going down. However, guest blogging for traffic is still an incredibly viable strategy. While that inbound link you get at the end of a guest post doesn’t have as much SEO value as it used to, it still has the value of exposing your content to a new audience.
You could get even more specific by narrowing it down to customer base. Is there a specific group of clients you tend to serve? Try including that in your long-tail key phrase. For example: “SEO agency for non-profits in Albuquerque NM.” That’s a key phrase you’re a lot more likely to rank for. Not to mention it will also attract way more targeted, organic traffic than a broad key phrase like “SEO agency.” 

So, how can you increase your chances of appearing on the first page of the search results? This blog post discusses the best 7 strategies to increase your organic search traffic. The strategies discussed below all relate to some form of Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO is a strategy that you can use to increase the chances of your site being found in the search results.
Here I find a better traffic generator software--Web Fire, it'll bring us real web traffic which means money for us. With it our site can get exposure in first page of Google within 7 minutes. It's so amazing 'coz it's available for all sites,all countries, all systems. Sounds great? Just check out details from: http://www.gy99.cn/51tui/scripts/click.php?a_aid=1&&a_bid=38a8545b
Just to make sure we’re all on the same page, let’s talk about how Google ranks content in the search engine results pages (SERPs). When a user goes to Google, Bing, or some other search browser out there, the browser will display results that are best suited to meet the user’s needs or answer their question. To earn organic traffic, you’d better hope that the content you’re creating shows up in the SERPs.
Encourage incoming links. Google prioritises sites that have a lot of incoming links, especially from other trustworthy sites. Encourage clients, friends, family members, partners, suppliers, industry mavens and friendly fellow bloggers to link to your site. The more incoming links you have the higher your site will rank. But beware SEO snake oil salesmen who try to trick Google with spammy links from low-reputation sites. Some links can actually damage your SEO.
For example, in Facebook, you can target specific groups or user pages that are cohesive with your keywords. You can then promote your website products or blog posts to that audience. In Twitter, you can search by hashtag for some of the keywords you write about. You can then reply or do a mention to that audience and see how your products or blog post can help them solve their problem.
The number one reason we hit our traffic goal this year was because we were diligent and committed to repurposing and republishing old content. Necktafy supports this idea, and does a great job explaining what they call the “two-year blogging nosedive.” Summarized, the blogging nosedive is when a piece of content stops generating organic traffic, typically after two years.
If you check out some of the suggestions below this though, you're likely to find some opportunities. You can also plug in a few variations of the question to find some search volume; for example, I could search for "cup of java" instead of "what is the meaning of a cup of java" and I'll get a number of keyword opportunities that I can align to the question.

Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.


This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?
No, this isn’t a tool to generate traffic jams on your way to work. Instead, it’s a piece of software a lot like 1MC, designed to send hits towards a website repeatedly. This one is a quick and easy to use program, with very little in the way of customization options, but that’s okay. It’s designed to do one thing and one thing only, and it does that thing.
PBP is sort of a cross between a traffic generator and a multi-level marketing scheme, only without the threats that MLM traditionally entails. You’re not absolutely required to sign up under someone, though the program does cost money on a monthly basis. You’re granted access to traffic generation tools, as well as other promotional information and training. The MLM comes in with their referral commissions, which many people use more than the marketing tools themselves. There’s a sizable commission for enrolling new members, as well as seeing them succeed.
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