Headlines are one of the most important parts of your content. Without a compelling headline, even the most comprehensive blog post will go unread. Master the art of headline writing. For example, the writers at BuzzFeed and Upworthy often write upward of twenty different headlines before finally settling on the one that will drive the most traffic, so think carefully about your headline before you hit “publish.”


The strength of your link profile isn’t solely determined by how many sites link back to you – it can also be affected by your internal linking structure. When creating and publishing content, be sure to keep an eye out for opportunities for internal links. This not only helps with SEO, but also results in a better, more useful experience for the user – the cornerstone of increasing traffic to your website.

The response rate here was huge because this is a mutually beneficial relationship. The bloggers get free products to use within their outfits (as well as more clothes for their wardrobe!) and I was able to drive traffic through to my site, get high-quality backlinks, a load of social media engagement and some high-end photography to use within my own content and on product pages.
Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:
What I’m getting at is using Google’s related searches to your advantage. Google related search queries are exactly what they sound like—searches that Google has algorithmically associated with certain groups of keywords. So, if you find a keyword that has high volume, is relevant to your target audience and business goals, and has relatively low competition, your job isn’t done. Instead, make sure that you’re taking note of related searches to ensure your content is in-depth and fully addresses the topic.
Beyond organic and direct traffic, you must understand the difference between all of your traffic sources and how traffic is classified. Most web analytics platforms, like Google Analytics, utilize an algorithm and flow chart based on the referring website or parameters set within the URL that determine the source of traffic. Here is a breakdown of all sources:
Once you have the piece of content you want to repurpose and the keywords you’re optimizing for, Google it. Type in the keywords and hit enter. Then, compare your content to the content that’s front and center on page one. What are they talking about that you’re not? Are there any topics you need to add? Is the content even relevant to what you’re trying to say? Based on the content, what can you assume the user’s intent is with that particular keyword?
Pumpkin Hacking – This is a term that I came across (thank you Peter Da Vanzo) that seems to describe exactly what we did to continue to grow our traffic by double and even triple digits, month after month. The core concept is simple; focus resources on building what works. What this meant for us was paying attention to the search verticals and content that received the most traffic, most comments, most social shares, and being quick to cut the cord on traffic that didn’t perform.
Mobile traffic: In the Groupon experiment mentioned above, Groupon found that both browser and device matter in web analytics’ ability to track organic traffic. Although desktops using common browsers saw a smaller impact from the test (10-20 percent), mobile devices saw a 50 percent drop in direct traffic when the site was de-indexed. In short, as mobile users grow, we are likely to see direct traffic rise even more from organic search traffic.
If you check out some of the suggestions below this though, you're likely to find some opportunities. You can also plug in a few variations of the question to find some search volume; for example, I could search for "cup of java" instead of "what is the meaning of a cup of java" and I'll get a number of keyword opportunities that I can align to the question.
So, how can you increase your chances of appearing on the first page of the search results? This blog post discusses the best 7 strategies to increase your organic search traffic. The strategies discussed below all relate to some form of Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO is a strategy that you can use to increase the chances of your site being found in the search results.

Open the app to to enter the number of visits, the interval between visits, and if you'd like to see pages displayed. The program's default sites to check file includes a few sites from the well-known Yahoo and MSN to an unfamiliar site we won't name in this review. Changing the list didn't change the fact the application directed traffic to the unfamiliar site more often than sites listed. Testers concluded the app masks the fact that every installation will direct traffic to that unfamiliar site.
It’s not enough to produce great content and hope that people find it – you have to be proactive. One of the best ways to increase traffic to your website is to use social media channels to promote your content. Twitter is ideal for short, snappy (and tempting) links, whereas Google+ promotion can help your site show up in personalized search results and seems especially effective in B2B niches. If you’re a B2C product company, you might find great traction with image-heavy social sites like Pinterest and Instagram. Here's more advice on making the most of social media marketing.

Writing a good piece of unique quality content will rank better in the search engines and it will also encourage people to like it, share it etc. People will not do that with your content if they see it as poor quality. Let’s be honest here, if you were reading something that you thought was pure garbage, would you read and share it? Of course you wouldn’t and neither would I.
Posting every other day or skipping days rather than regularly posting on your website will not be going to attract traffic to your website. So, you should always have enough content in your hand that you can post regularly. One of the major benefits that regular posting will give you is that you will have regular traffic on your website which ultimately going to increase your organic traffic. Another thing is that your talent or skill will sharpen with regular writing & posting content. If you have a busy schedule or running a business at the same time, then you should hire writers to assist you.

This topic seems actually quite controversial. Google answered the question by what could be taken as a denial. But their answer was kind of open to interpretations. And on the other hand, there are studies (one of them from Moz) that showed linking out has an impact. So, how can you be so assertive? Is it something that comes out from your own experiments?
Every website has to be structured in a way to make it easy for your audience to find what they’re looking for. There are several elements residing on your site that help in optimizing for SEO. The content that you write that you’re most proud of serves as your “cornerstone” content. Think of a mall and the one or two department stores that are called Anchor Stores. They are the reason people come to the mall. Your cornerstone content should play that role. They should be the main reason for people to come to this website.

For example, in Facebook, you can target specific groups or user pages that are cohesive with your keywords. You can then promote your website products or blog posts to that audience. In Twitter, you can search by hashtag for some of the keywords you write about. You can then reply or do a mention to that audience and see how your products or blog post can help them solve their problem.
Once you have the piece of content you want to repurpose and the keywords you’re optimizing for, Google it. Type in the keywords and hit enter. Then, compare your content to the content that’s front and center on page one. What are they talking about that you’re not? Are there any topics you need to add? Is the content even relevant to what you’re trying to say? Based on the content, what can you assume the user’s intent is with that particular keyword?
There is absolutely no reason why your on-page optimization should not be perfect. It can mean the different between your website showing up on page three of the search results and your website being the top listing. We encounter so many local businesses that simply ignore their on-page optimization (or the prior SEO company didn’t optimize correctly).
Just to make sure we’re all on the same page, let’s talk about how Google ranks content in the search engine results pages (SERPs). When a user goes to Google, Bing, or some other search browser out there, the browser will display results that are best suited to meet the user’s needs or answer their question. To earn organic traffic, you’d better hope that the content you’re creating shows up in the SERPs.

Other content should then link into that cornerstone content. This creates internal links between your blog posts. Make sure that you always link back to your cornerstone content, to tell the search engines of the importance of that content. Internal linking this way optimizes your SEO. By optimizing your SEO, you increase the organic search traffic to your blog.
This is the practice of optimizing your SEO using services or websites that are external to your website. For example, as your website or blog gains popularity, there are services or website that will give your domain an Authority Value. Domain Authority is an indication of how well your domain will rank in the search engine results pages. There is another set of strategies you can use to optimize for Off-Site SEO that I will write about in a future post. However, Strategy #7 below is an example of an off-site SEO method.

Thanks for sharing this insightful article on how to get organic traffic to my website. I agree with you that it is really frustrating posting articles on a site with little or no traffic to view my content. I think your article is right on time and I agree that creating high quality content, targeting low competition keywords, not being distracted and other vital points you made will really help me generate traffic into my blog. 

The number one reason we hit our traffic goal this year was because we were diligent and committed to repurposing and republishing old content. Necktafy supports this idea, and does a great job explaining what they call the “two-year blogging nosedive.” Summarized, the blogging nosedive is when a piece of content stops generating organic traffic, typically after two years.
The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.

Hey, Matt! Thank you for your sharing, and I learned much from it, but I still have a question. We began to do SEO work for our site 2 years ago, and our organic traffic grew 5 times ( from 8K to 40K every day). But two years later, it is very difficult to get it grow more, even it drop to 3.2K every day. So can you give me any advice to make our site's traffic grow again? Thank you in advance!
To do this, I often align the launch of my content with a couple of guest posts on relevant websites to drive a load of relevant traffic to it, as well as some relevant links. This has a knock-on effect toward the organic amplification of the content and means that you at least have something to show for the content (in terms of ROI) if it doesn't do as well as you expect organically.
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