Other content should then link into that cornerstone content. This creates internal links between your blog posts. Make sure that you always link back to your cornerstone content, to tell the search engines of the importance of that content. Internal linking this way optimizes your SEO. By optimizing your SEO, you increase the organic search traffic to your blog.
Buffer App: This is a free app that you connect to your social media accounts. You can upgrade to a Pro account that gives you more features. You can configure the dates & times you need to post. Once your accounts are connected, you can select what you want to share on social media and click on Buffer. It’ll ask you which accounts you want to post to and you can customize the “message” you want to promote, by adding hashtags, images and a brief description. You can also install a Chrome extension that allows you to instantly “Buffer” any website post you’re on.
In my experience, content has impacted SEO and organic traffic more than pretty much any other one element (assuming you have a reasonably clean, fast, structurally sound site). That’s not to say things like sitemaps and link building aren’t important. They are, 100%. But, if you’re really trying to increase organic traffic dramatically, improving and creating content will be your best bet because it's essentially what your site is made up of. Plus, great content can help you earn links and boost your traffic in other ways so it’s what you should start with anyway.
Open the app to to enter the number of visits, the interval between visits, and if you'd like to see pages displayed. The program's default sites to check file includes a few sites from the well-known Yahoo and MSN to an unfamiliar site we won't name in this review. Changing the list didn't change the fact the application directed traffic to the unfamiliar site more often than sites listed. Testers concluded the app masks the fact that every installation will direct traffic to that unfamiliar site.

As we briefly mentioned above, your website or blog posts should target your audience (your prospects, your readers). You should be writing to them. You should be asking yourself what your target audience is searching for on Google. Based on that, you should provide the solutions to their inquiries in the form of content that is coherent with their search terms. In other words, the keywords or key phrases you use within your content must coincide with what your audience is actively searching.
Also consider forums where people hang out and discuss various subjects. Asking and answering questions is a great way to increase your own knowledge as well as sharing the knowledge you already have. Being active in these forums (Quora for example) is another way to get good exposure. Remember though, no Spamming, or your time there will be short.
I can honestly say from the experience of working on this project it is almost never as it seems. We began with targeting a very large segment of users (remember that time I talked about a keyword database of over 50,000 keywords?) but after a few months it turned out our largest (and most active) users were finding us from only a handful of targeted categories.
The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.
Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
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