When you start writing a new blog post, you should first research the keywords or key phrases that your audience is searching for. Think of what you’re going to write about and brainstorm on a title that will contain your keyword or long-tail keyword within. Of course, your blog post title should be catchy or invite curiosity so that your audience clicks on it. I had already written about how to optimize headings in this post (look for Simple Way #1).
I can honestly say from the experience of working on this project it is almost never as it seems. We began with targeting a very large segment of users (remember that time I talked about a keyword database of over 50,000 keywords?) but after a few months it turned out our largest (and most active) users were finding us from only a handful of targeted categories.
People use search engines to get more information about the products or services that they are interested in purchasing, as well as the businesses that they are interested in purchasing from. Consumers will turn to search engines before doing business with a large national company, and they will also utilize search engines when planning to make local purchases as well.
For example, in Facebook, you can target specific groups or user pages that are cohesive with your keywords. You can then promote your website products or blog posts to that audience. In Twitter, you can search by hashtag for some of the keywords you write about. You can then reply or do a mention to that audience and see how your products or blog post can help them solve their problem.
If you haven’t used software like BuzzSumo to check out what your competitors are up to, you’re at a huge disadvantage. These services aggregate the social performance of specific sites and content to provide you with an at-a-glance view of what topics are resonating with readers and, most importantly, making the rounds on social media. Find out what people are reading (and talking about), and emulate that kind of content to bring traffic to your website.
What I’m getting at is using Google’s related searches to your advantage. Google related search queries are exactly what they sound like—searches that Google has algorithmically associated with certain groups of keywords. So, if you find a keyword that has high volume, is relevant to your target audience and business goals, and has relatively low competition, your job isn’t done. Instead, make sure that you’re taking note of related searches to ensure your content is in-depth and fully addresses the topic.
Posting every other day or skipping days rather than regularly posting on your website will not be going to attract traffic to your website. So, you should always have enough content in your hand that you can post regularly. One of the major benefits that regular posting will give you is that you will have regular traffic on your website which ultimately going to increase your organic traffic. Another thing is that your talent or skill will sharpen with regular writing & posting content. If you have a busy schedule or running a business at the same time, then you should hire writers to assist you.
Your keyword research will determine whether or not your search optimization effort will be a success or a failure. Many businesses make the mistake of basing their keywords on just the search volume. This often leads to attempting to rank for keywords that are very difficult and costly to move up, or even keywords that aren’t “buyer” keywords and just send useless traffic to the website.
The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.

Pumpkin Hacking – This is a term that I came across (thank you Peter Da Vanzo) that seems to describe exactly what we did to continue to grow our traffic by double and even triple digits, month after month. The core concept is simple; focus resources on building what works. What this meant for us was paying attention to the search verticals and content that received the most traffic, most comments, most social shares, and being quick to cut the cord on traffic that didn’t perform.


This community is full of opportunities if you're a fashion-based retailer. One of the major advantages is the fact that they add links to each of the products that they feature within their outfits - the links go directly to product pages. This is the holy grail for ecommerce SEO, and the traffic those links will bring through will convert at a very high rate.
Buffer App: This is a free app that you connect to your social media accounts. You can upgrade to a Pro account that gives you more features. You can configure the dates & times you need to post. Once your accounts are connected, you can select what you want to share on social media and click on Buffer. It’ll ask you which accounts you want to post to and you can customize the “message” you want to promote, by adding hashtags, images and a brief description. You can also install a Chrome extension that allows you to instantly “Buffer” any website post you’re on.
There is a new revolutionary tool that would solve the above problems.This tool provides specific and targeted leads and traffic to any niche you are promoting and it has a very high conversion rate.That what i use.So i don't just buy traffic,i buy targeted traffic.This software makes use of SMS which is sent to specific leads that are looking for what you can provide for them.
Granted, the blog post I wrote today gives you a taste of some of the strategies you can use to increase your organic search traffic. However, SEO is a lot more involved than that. As I said before, there are lots of courses on SEO, free and paid training you can follow. One great blog that I enjoy reading to increase my SEO knowledge is the HOTH. I actually linked to a post of theirs on “Domain Authority” in the section titled Off-Site SEO above.
Once you have the piece of content you want to repurpose and the keywords you’re optimizing for, Google it. Type in the keywords and hit enter. Then, compare your content to the content that’s front and center on page one. What are they talking about that you’re not? Are there any topics you need to add? Is the content even relevant to what you’re trying to say? Based on the content, what can you assume the user’s intent is with that particular keyword?
Alas, there is no quick solution, especially when no one actually knows how Google’s search engine algorithm actually works. The strategies highlighted within this post are some of the better known strategies that improve your ranking chances. And, remember, whatever strategies you use will take time. Don’t expect a sudden increase in traffic if you tweak your SEO.
Hey Ashok! Good question. I work with clients in a lot of different industries, so the tactics I employ are often quite different depending on the client. In general though, creating killer resources around popular topics, or tools related to client services. This provides a ton of outreach opportunity. For example: We had a client build a tool that allowed webmasters to quickly run SSL scans on their sites and identofy non-secure resources. We reached out to people writing about SSLs, Https migration etc and pitched it as a value-add. We built ~50 links to that tool in 45 days. Not a massive total, but they were pretty much all DR 40+.
Everyone wants to rank for those broad two or three word key phrases because they tend to have high search volumes. The problem with these broad key phrases is they are highly competitive. So competitive that you may not stand a chance of ranking for them unless you devote months of your time to it. Instead of spending your time going after something that may not even be attainable, go after the low-hanging fruit of long-tail key phrases.
The number one reason we hit our traffic goal this year was because we were diligent and committed to repurposing and republishing old content. Necktafy supports this idea, and does a great job explaining what they call the “two-year blogging nosedive.” Summarized, the blogging nosedive is when a piece of content stops generating organic traffic, typically after two years.
There is a new revolutionary tool that would solve the above problems.This tool provides specific and targeted leads and traffic to any niche you are promoting and it has a very high conversion rate.That what i use.So i don't just buy traffic,i buy targeted traffic.This software makes use of SMS which is sent to specific leads that are looking for what you can provide for them.
The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.
This isn’t necessarily anything really technical, but rather subjective. In my humble content marketing opinion, perfection is overrated. Now, does that mean you get to skip out on the research and publish crap? No, no. Instead, it means that there is a point of diminishing returns and sometimes, it’s better to ship it, assess performance, and revise.
This one is so obvious, we’re going to look at it first. Paid search, social media advertising and display advertising (try our Smart Ads Creator!) are all excellent ways of attracting visitors, building your brand and getting your site in front of people. Adjust your paid strategies to suit your goals – do you just want more traffic, or are you looking to increase conversions, too? Each paid channel has its pros and cons, so think carefully about your objectives before you reach for your credit card.
Your keyword research will determine whether or not your search optimization effort will be a success or a failure. Many businesses make the mistake of basing their keywords on just the search volume. This often leads to attempting to rank for keywords that are very difficult and costly to move up, or even keywords that aren’t “buyer” keywords and just send useless traffic to the website.
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Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.
Your keyword research will determine whether or not your search optimization effort will be a success or a failure. Many businesses make the mistake of basing their keywords on just the search volume. This often leads to attempting to rank for keywords that are very difficult and costly to move up, or even keywords that aren’t “buyer” keywords and just send useless traffic to the website.
Optimise for your personas, not search engines. First and foremost, write your buyer personas so you know to whom you’re addressing your content. By creating quality educational content that resonates with you>r ideal buyers, you’ll naturally improve your SEO. This means tapping into the main issues of your personas and the keywords they use in search queries. Optimising for search engines alone is useless; all you’ll have is keyword-riddled nonsense.
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